US deports Indonesian Christian who fled persecutionMay 19, 2017 6:54pm

ELIZABETH, N.J. (AP) — A Christian man who had been living in the United States for 16 years after fleeing religious persecution in Indonesia has been deported back to the country, immigration officials said.

Arino Massie was deported to Indonesia on Thursday after being held at the Elizabeth Detention Center in New Jersey since last week, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials. Massie leaves behind his wife and a 13-year-old son, who is a U.S. citizen.

Massie was one of four Indonesian Christian men who were detained by ICE after checking in with officials in Newark. The other three men remain in detention. They all escaped religious persecution in Indonesia in the 1990s.

About 50 supporters rallied outside of the Elizabeth Detention Center on Thursday afternoon, but he already had been sent to Indonesia, NJ.com reported (http://bit.ly/2rxNqdF ).

The former Metuchen resident does not have a criminal record. He was ordered deported years ago but allowed to stay in the country as long as he checked in with immigration officials periodically.

Rev. Seth Kaper-Dale, of The Reformed Church of Highland Park, led Massie's group of supporters. The gubernatorial candidate stressed Massie's unique situation.

"There's no reason to send him away right now; he's absolutely not a criminal," Kaper-Dale said. "These are family people who happen to have final deportation orders."

Under Republican President Donald Trump, the scope of those subject to deportation was broadened. In many cases, even people who don't have criminal records are no longer allowed to stay in the U.S., Kaper-Dale.

"Our folks got caught up in that new dragnet," he said.

Democrat U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone sent a letter to Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials asking them to allow the men to remain in the country. Pallone cited the group's original agreement with immigration officials.

ICE spokesman Luis Martinez confirmed Massie's deportation but did not comment further on the case.

A court filing by Massey's attorney seeking permission for his client to remain in the United States was denied Thursday morning, Kaper-Dale said.

Massie waved goodbye to the U.S. a few hours later.

___

This story has been corrected to show that Massie was living in Metuchen, not that he was born there.

___

Information from: NJ.com, http://www.nj.com

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Leader of Connecticut mosque detained, faces deportationA Connecticut imam has been detained by U.S. immigration agents and is facing deportation to Pakistan
Judge will reconsider ruling blocking sanctuary cities orderA federal judge has agreed to reconsider his ruling blocking President Donald Trump's executive order to cut funding from sanctuary cities that limit cooperation with U.S. immigration authorities
Graphic shows Trump FY 2018 budget breakdown; 2c x 6 1/2 inches; 96.3 mm x 165 mm;
Agency-by-agency look at Trump's budget
FILE – In this Sept. 23, 2016, file photo, Muslim worshippers pray during a service at the Bernards Township Community Center in Basking Ridge, N.J. The Bernards Township committee voted Tuesday, May 23, 2017, to settle two lawsuits over its denial of a proposed mosque, filed by the U.S. Justice Department and the Islamic Society of Basking Ridge. Some residents say their opposition is because of the selected location, not religious intolerance. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
Town agrees to settle lawsuits after denying plan for mosque
In the photo provided by Neal Augenstein, WTOP, Richard Collins III's graduation gown draped over front row chairs at Bowie State University ceremony, Tuesday, May 23, 2017, in College Park, Md. Collins, 23, who was visiting friends at the College Park campus, had just been commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army and would have graduated from Bowie State, was stabbed and killed Saturday, May 20, 2017.   (Neal Augenstein/WTOP via AP)
Graduation day bittersweet for slain black scholar's friends
In this photo taken April 4, 2017, the Supreme Court Building is seen in Washington. The Supreme Court struck down two congressional districts in North Carolina Monday, May 22, 2017, because race played too large a role in their creation, a decision voting rights advocates said would boost challenges in other states. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
High court ruling may give voter rights groups a strong tool
This component is currently unavailable.
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices