The Latest: House to require training vs. sexual harassmentNovember 14, 2017 8:50pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on sexual misconduct in Congress (all times local):

3:45 p.m.

Speaker Paul Ryan has announced that the House will adopt a policy requiring all members of Congress and their staffs to undergo training to prevent sexual harassment.

The announcement comes shortly after the Committee on House Administration held a hearing during which two female lawmakers shared stories about current members of Congress engaging in sexual harassment.

Ryan says in a statement, "our goal is not only to raise awareness, but also make abundantly clear that harassment in any form has no place in this institution."

Earlier Tuesday, Rep. Jackie Speier, who introduced a bill to make training mandatory, said two sitting lawmakers — one Republican and one Democrat — engaged in sexually inappropriate behavior. Rep. Barbara Comstock said a trusted source told her a lawmaker exposed himself to a staffer.

___

10:50 a.m.

A Republican congresswoman says she was recently told by a trusted source that a member of Congress exposed himself to a staffer.

Rep. Barbara Comstock, R-Va., said Tuesday at a House hearing on preventing sexual harassment on Capitol Hill that she was told about a staffer who quit her job after a lawmaker asked her to bring work material to his house, then exposed himself.

Stories of sexual harassment and gender hostility are continuing to come to light in various industries, including entertainment and politics.

Comstock did not name the member nor the staffer.

Rep. Jackie Speier at the same hearing said there are two current members who have been involved in sexual harassment.

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